Thursday, 6 November 2008

Carling

It might be fizzy yellow swill, but it's our fizzy yellow swill. There's a new ad campaign that emphasises how bloody British Carling is, based on the provenance of the barley used to produce it. The central message is misleading. 100% of the barley used might well be domestically produced, but that ignores the fact that cheap adjuncts are used to bulk up the grain bill. If you compare lagers that contain rice or maize to those made with 100% malted barley, there's a world of difference in terms of appearance, head formation, mouthfeel and - most importantly - flavour.


This ad was spotted at a bus stop on Clerkenwell Road, directly opposite the site of the old Griffin Brewery.

15 comments:

  1. Haven't they tried this before with "A Beer Like Us" - implying that "we" are tasteless, gaseous catpiss?

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  2. Or like those awful Harp ads with lads from Norn Irn saying "It's our thing". They can keep it.(Sorry Beer Nut, I couldn't help thinking in that accent ;)).

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  3. There were some Czech ads during the Euros for Gambrinus that went along the lines of "Whoever isn't singing isn't Czech!" - whilst swinging great pots of Gamcrap around.

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  4. Oh but look, it's in such a nice can, just right when packed up in a crate from Tesco's and taken to the park to get hammered.....when it's in such a nice can it doesn't really matter where the barley comes from.

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  5. Years ago, when I lived on the island, there was a nitro Carling lager. Is this still available?? Obviously a marketing gimmick. Carling should be in the shit American lager category, as there's nothing terribly British about it.
    Bell, keep it up. I now consider you cutting edge. You're doing a hell of a job in there in London Town!

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  6. The version of this ad used in Northern Ireland is actually slightly different: "Only the best barley makes it". Probably for the best, all things considered.

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  7. Actually, since reading this post this morning I've had the lyrics "Carling Black Label, light-hearted lager, so full of flavour, Carling!" running through my head. Now there was a catchy ad! :P

    Only tried it once, about 1992 when it seemed to be very popular in some bars in Fermoy, Co. Cork, where I worked for a while. I have not tried it since.

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  8. Carling should be in the shit American lager category

    Shit Canadian lager, to be strictly accurate, though Thomas Carling came originally from Yorkshire ...

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  9. Bass bought the license to sell Carling in the sixties , so its canadian piss. Did you know that Whitbread originally tried to reduce the strengh of Stella but they refused to let them brew it under license if they reduced the strengh, but Heineken let them do this. Did you also know that Whitbread used to throw a javelin too.

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  10. The grain could be planted by the Queen herself but it still doesn't make it a good beer!

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  11. Coxy, one of the Whitbreads - indeed the eldest son of the current head of the family - is a regular in my pub. I was out on the grumble and grunt with him on Monday. Rude bastard, he is.

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  12. The two hands in the poster do not belong to the same body, either, it's a bit like the Levi's ads back in the seventies where God gave Adam a pair of Levi's in a rather tasteless version of the Creation.

    And would Carling drinkers care about the barley at all? Come on!

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  13. We've got a Whitbread Pale Ale brewed in Ohio somewhere that I just can't be bothered with buying. Didn't they leave the brewing world and move on to hotels? I remember years ago it was a nice beer. I have no interest in buying the American version.

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  14. Also, why have they put a photo of wheat growing in a field?

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  15. According to the Committee of Advertising Practice code:
    "No marketing communication should mislead, or be likely to mislead, by inaccuracy, ambiguity, exaggeration, omission or otherwise."

    There seems to be lots of inaccuracy, ambiguity and omission here.

    The code also states:
    "Marketers should not exploit the credulity, lack of knowledge or inexperience of consumers."

    As the only people to drink Carling are incredulous, inexperienced and have a lack of knowledge, any advert for it is against the rules!

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